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Jeff Motske, CFP®
President and CEO

"For 10 years, I have used proven coaching strategies to help clients strive for their most important financial goals through behavior modification and sound planning."

Jeff Motske, CFP®

Jeff Motske is an author, an accomplished executive, radio personality and financial advisor. He is the author of The Couple's Guide to Financial Compatibility and hosts the weekly radio show, Declare Your Financial Independence, where he crusades to bring real planning to real people and help them use the proven steps toward financial independence.   But that's not what's special about him, what's special about Jeff happens on a Tuesday afternoon at his son's baseball practice, or a Thursday night playing slow-pitch softball with his 70 plus year-old dad, or an early morning pouring over ideas with his wife, Kendra. Jeff is one-of-a-kind in the financial services world because he knows and lives what some people really don't understand: financial success isn't a destination, it's a choice and a commitment, one decision at a time.

Jeff started as just another California kid with Midwestern roots. He got a job straight out of college with a small mutual fund company doing retirement planning. But his aspirations grew. As he watched the landscape of financial services, Jeff saw in living color how disconnected most of his industry was from the real-life, everyday issues of Americans. He saw, with great remorse, how distant his profession could become from the people it served and from the goals they espoused. His clients were making the hard decisions to pay down debt, save for the future in small sums, commit to their families and their work, live deeply-rooted lives. He believed that financial planning could be more like what he saw in his client's lives everyday and less like Wall Street. By creating Trilogy Financial in 1999, and bringing together the resources for middle-class Americans to find financial independence, Jeff has focused on revolutionizing his industry and is still doing so today.




 

 

Jeff's Client Relationships

Jeff and his team support a wide variety of clients, but here are some of the groups he has built his practice around.

 

Four Ways to Take the Taboo Out of Talking About Money with Your Spouse

Money is a commonly held taboo topic, like politics and religion. We just don’t feel comfortable talking about them – especially to people we care about. That’s because these topics are tied closely to how we view ourselves. These topics also garner a lot of judgment, and the last thing we want is to be judged on something that we feel is intrinsically linked to our intelligence or sense of maturity. Yet, by practicing a few simple tips, we can start tackling the taboo topic of family finances and get on that path to financial independence.

Be Honest

It is human nature to want to hide things we may not be proud of or want to avoid. Perhaps you charged a bit too much to your credit cards or haven’t saved as much as you planned for all of your family’s goals. You may want to avoid addressing such issues, but those who are part of your financial household need to know the honest, unvarnished state of your finances. Trying to hide the facts will just compound your issues when they come to light – and they will.

Be Frequent

Don’t just talk about money when money is a problem. That’s when stress levels are high and emotions are frayed. What needs to be a level-headed discussion can quickly escalate into an emotional shouting match. Instead, conversations about finances should become routine. If you schedule a monthly financial date night with your spouse, the frequent exposure will minimize the surprise and anxiety from these talks. Ultimately, there will be fewer surprises and more planning to help when unexpected or hard decisions need to be made.

Be Open to Feedback

You and your spouse are a team. Teams succeed by working together towards the same goals. Teammates, though, don’t always see things the same way and may have different approaches to the same objective. That’s why it’s important to get your spouse’s input on how your finances are being managed. Not only does your spouse’s input ensure you’re working towards the same goals, but different perspectives can also provide multiple solutions to financial issues. Most importantly, your spouse feels heard and validated, which is a precious thing to give to the one you love.

Be Non-Judgmental

What causes many to shy away from discussing finances is the idea that they will be judged for things they did or did not do with their money. Did you mismanage your funds and refrain from saving sufficiently? Were you too risky with your investments or not risky enough to provide for the household? To avoid the judgment, most will just avoid talking about their finances all together, which doesn’t often have good outcomes. Avoidance doesn’t help financial situations – it often just prolongs the mess. To help your spouse open up, it is beneficial to allow them to speak openly and freely and to listen without judgment.

I do believe that it is imperative to take the taboo out of talking about money with your spouse. Both of you should foster frequent and honest financial discussions, free of strife and judgment. Doing these things will allow you to solidify yourselves as a strong financial team and set you on your path for collective financial independence.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

 


 

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